Mayo Clinic Health Library

Ovulation

Updated: 06-14-2012

Transcript

Ovulation is the release of an egg from one of the ovaries. It often happens about midway through the menstrual cycle, although the exact timing may vary.

In preparation for ovulation, the lining of the uterus, or endometrium, thickens.

The pituitary gland in the brain stimulates one of the ovaries to release an egg.

The wall of the ovarian follicle ruptures at the surface of the ovary. The egg is released.

Finger-like structures called fimbriae sweep the egg into the neighboring fallopian tube.

The egg travels through the fallopian tube, propelled in part by contractions in the fallopian tube walls.

Here in the fallopian tube, the egg may be fertilized by a sperm.

If the egg is fertilized, the egg and sperm unite to form a one-celled entity called a zygote.

As the zygote travels down the fallopian tube toward the uterus, it begins dividing rapidly to form a cluster of cells resembling a tiny raspberry.

When the zygote reaches the uterus, it implants in the lining of the uterus and pregnancy begins.

If the egg isn't fertilized, it's simply reabsorbed by the body — perhaps before it even reaches the uterus. About two weeks later, the lining of the uterus sheds through the vagina. This is known as menstruation.