Mayo Clinic Health Library

Esophagectomy

Updated: 01-24-2012

Transcript

During an esophagectomy, part of your esophagus is removed, along with the top part of your stomach and nearby lymph nodes. These lymph nodes can capture bacteria, viruses and other harmful material, including cancer or other abnormal cells, moving through your body. Typically, the remainder of your stomach is then pulled up through the opening in your diaphragm, called the hiatus, and attached to the remaining part of the esophagus. An esophagectomy can offer peace of mind because cancer can't develop in a part of the esophagus that's been removed.

Site view: at a glance